Monday, May 25, 2015

against nato - campaign in Italy


workers in turkey in struggle!



Metal işçilerinin direnişi büyüyerek devam ediyor

CFbZxOZWoAAdy44-1Metal işçilerinin direnişi büyüyerek devam ediyor. Bursa’da Ototrim ve Valeo ile Kocaeli Ford Otosan’da da üretim durdu, direniş başladı

Metal işkolundaki direniş büyüyerek devam ediyor. Bursa’da Renault fabrikasında başlayan, TOFAŞ, Coşkunzöz ve Mako’ya sıçrayan direniş yeni fabrikalarla genişledi. Yine Bursa’da bulunan Ototrim ve Valo fabrikaları ile Kocaeli’deki Ford Otosan fabrikalarında işçiler üretimi durdurarak direnişe geçti.
Kocaeli’de dün direnişe geçme kararını açıklayan Ford işçileri fabrika önünde bir açıklama yaptı. Eylemin başlamasıyla birlikte polis fabrika çevresini ablukaya aldı. Ford fabrikası önüne oldukça kalabalık yığınak yapan polis işçileri “Dağılın yoksa dağıtacağız” anonsu geçerken, işçiler ise kararlı bir şekilde eylemi sürdüreceklerini ifade etti. Ford’da sarı sendika Türk-İş Türk Metal’den istifalar da başladı.

ford
Ototrim işçileri: ‘Kale sağlam’

ototrim_20mayis_1
Valeo... Bosch’
valeo_20mayis_1
– Bizlerin talepleri de Bursa’daki metal işçisi kardeşlerimizin talepleriyle aynıdır.
-Ücretlerimiz Bosch sözleşmesi baz alınarak yeniden  ayarlansın, MESS bunun için gerekeni yapsın.
-Yaşadığımız süreçten dolayı hiçbir işçinin işine son verilmeyeceği konusunda garanti verilsin.
-Bu süreçte işten atılan işçi arkadaşlarımız geri alınsan
-Türk Metal sendikası Ford’tan gidecek
-Temsilcilerimizi demokratik bir yöntemle belirleyeceğiz.
Ankara ve Aliağa’dan direnişine destek
Bursa’..Koç Holding’e ait Türk Traktör fabrikasında.....İzmir Aliağa’da da Petrol-İş..Petkim fabrikasında bir basın açıklaması gerçekleştirdi. Petrol-İş
petrolis_destek_20mayis_1


WE DEMAND THE IMMEDIATE RELEASE OF DR G N SAIBABA - 2

May 23, 2015
Press Statement
23rd May 2015
A little over one year after the abduction and arrest of Dr. GN Saibaba, poets, intellectuals, artists, teachers, students, activists came together for a Convention against Silencing Democracy & Criminalizing Dissent at the Hindi Bhawan in New Delhi. This convention was organized in solidarity with Dr. GN Saibaba, Assistant Professor of English at Ram Lal Anand College, University of Delhi and a well-known human rights activist. Dr. Saibaba, a person with 90% physical disability hailing from an underprivileged background, has been in the forefront of democratic movements across the subcontinent. Ever since his arrest, Dr. Saibaba has been kept in torturous conditions in the anda cell in Nagpur Central Jail. He has been denied the most basic facilities crucial for his survival in jail. This convention intended to highlight Dr. Saibaba’s condition in jail and the treatment meted out to him as well as demands his immediate release.
Speakers included the chairperson of the Committee for the Defence and Release of Dr. GN Saibaba, Prof. G Haragopal felt that the hallmark of democracy is the preservation of ideas and the burden of proof lies with the political parties. Thus, he found that, “Dissent or unpopular idea may not be relevant now but it is crucial for posterity”. Amit Bhattacharya, Professor of History in Jadavpur University found that, “When attempts to curtail sustain over such a long period, the laws are used for the purpose of justifying these attempts.” A civil rights activist from West Bengal, Sujato Bhadro, asserted, “The judicial system is harbouring the practice of declaring criminal any thought antithetical to the existing establishment.” Amit Bhaduri, Professor Emeritus, JNU, emphasized that, “the ruling class doesn’t think that certain ideas should surface. It is time for us to recognize and say this openly as our silence gives legitimacy to the kind of that rule that jails people like Dr. Saibaba.” KJ Mukherjee, a professor from JNU, stressed the need to move beyond our safe spaces and take this fight for our rights to the centers of struggle. DUTA President, Nandita Narain said, “There is no justification for his arrest and detention which is nothing short of torture and physical and mental humiliation heaped on him. Irrespective of his views, we need to salute his courage. It is the value that needs to be fostered in all the young among us.” Prof. N Raghuram of IP University underlined that, “in people like Dr. Saibaba lies our freedom. That is the single most important reason for fighting for him and for social change.”
Cultural activist and editor of Vidrohi magazine, Sudhir Dhawale, who was acquitted and released from jail soon after Dr. Saibaba was arrested, stated that, “When the whole country lives in fear of being jailed for the freedom of thought, we need to accept that fascism is knocking on our door.” Political activist Kavita Krishnan felt that this fight to free political prisoners everywhere is a fight we fight for ourselves. Malem Ningthouja noted the connection between this notion of democracy, laws, the claim of protecting national security and development. He highlighted the irony of a state that claims to be a democracy jailing its democratic voices. Prof. Jatinder Singh from Panjabi University, Patiala underlined the significance of the dissent and if it is seen as a flame, then he felt that it was a flame that needed to be lit. Noted film maker Sanjay Kak felt this is a moment for us to turn out reverses into an opportunity where while pressing for Dr. Saibaba’s release we get through to more people about the conditions he had been highlighting that led to his arrest.
Rebecca Mammon John, Senior Advocate of the Supreme Court stressed that, “the judiciary is complicit and hand in glove with the ruling establishment in ensuring that the basic rights of prisoners is denied when politically expedient.” Arundhati Roy felt that Dr. Saibaba is in jail today because he was too successful in exposing the state sponsored Operation Green Hunt. She said, “When the best institutions that money can buy are pitted against the people of this country, it is up to us to understand how these forces operate and fight them.” She expressed her solidarity with the large section of the Left and felt that this was a time to unite on not just the release of Dr. Saibaba but also the struggle against exploitation by corporations that landed him in jail.
Many poets, cultural activists, organisations, and teachers spoke at the convention including journalist Panini Anand, Abhishek Srivastava, and Manisha Sethi of JTSA, N Sachin from DU, Animesh from IFTU, Jeevan Chandra of RDF, Madhu Chopra, Pankaj Tyagi and others. Those who attended the convention unanimously voted in favour of the resolution attached along with this statement.
——–
RESOLUTION dt. 23 May 2015, passed at Hindi Bhavan
Dr G N Saibaba, Assistant Professor of English at Ram Lal Anand College, University of Delhi, was on his way home from the evaluation center in the University campus when the Maharashtra Police intercepted his car and abducted him without following any procedure laid down by the law of the land. Later it was revealed that Dr Saibaba was charged under sections 13, 18, 20, 38 and 39 of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967. Dr Saibaba, a 90% disabled person hailing from an underprivileged background, has been the forefront of democratic movements across the subcontinent and has raised his voice loudly against the oppression and the exploitation of the poorest of the poor by the State machinery, which is hand in glove with the corporate world.
Ever since his arrest, Dr Saibaba has been kept in the notorious “anda” cell in Nagpur Central Jail. He has been denied the most basic facilities including medical help needed for his survival. Even the Jail Superintendent of the Nagpur Central Prison admits in a statement filed in the District Court at Gadchiroli, Maharashtra, on May 11, 2015:
As the said prisoner is 90% physically handicapped with heart disease, bone deformity, neurological problems, kidney stone and gall bladder stone, he requires constant expert evaluation and treatment.
Unless Dr Saibaba gets immediate expert medical attention, his survival itself is in danger. Imprisoning a 90% disabled person is itself illegal as it violates the provisions of the Code of Criminal Procedure, the Persons with Disabilities Act, and UN Conventions. Denial of bail in this condition is nothing but an attempt at extrajudicial murder.
In this context, on this day the 23rd of May, 2015, we the people gathered here in the “Convention against silencing democracy and criminalizing dissent” in the Hindi Bhavan, New Delhi, unanimously resolve that we shall take our struggle forward till Dr G N Saibaba is released. We appeal to all the democratic organizations and individuals to join with us in our struggle.
WE DEMAND THE IMMEDIATE RELEASE OF DR G N SAIBABA
- See more at: http://sanhati.com/articles/13580/#sthash.WsFbXdKV.dpuf


freedom for Saibaba! 1

May 22, 2015
saibaba
By Karen Gabriel and P K Vijayan
Let’s talk about hunger. Hunger is a mother. But this is not just the mother who is among the 60 per cent women who constitute the hungry people on earth; this is not the mother who starves herself so her starving child can feed; nor the mother whose one meal is constituted of leftovers at the end of the day, to keep her alive to be a mother, and survive on leftovers again the next day; nor she who will forsake even those measly morsels that keep her alive as a mother.
No, hunger is the mother whose offspring are malnutrition, disease and death. Hunger is the mother whose hydra-headed offspring endlessly mutate, various forms of malnutrition and disease and death going forth and multiplying in the land, as hunger spreads her roomy wings. Hunger and her offspring feed endlessly, gluttonously, not just on health and strength and the ability to work, but on the human spirit itself, and its dignity and self-respect. Hunger and her multitudes mock the labour of the peasant, the farmer and the worker, the artisan, the homeless and the urban poor, the artist, the small shopkeeper and the sex-worker, saying “No matter how much you want to work, no matter how much you actually work, no matter what you do or sell, you will never satiate us!”
Hunger is the number 1 cause of death in India, a country dogged by the “pervasive presence of persistent hunger” as Amartya Sen put it in his 2003 address at Delhi University. There are 870 million chronically hungry people – meaning people who have no possible means of ever alleviating their hunger – in the world, and one third of them – about 276 million [1] – are in India alone. In his 2013 McDougal lecture, Sen noted that ‘India alone has the largest absolute number of hungry people on earth’. Every day, more than 7000 Indians die of hunger – each day, day after day, 7000 Indians per day. 10 million people die of hunger and hunger-related ailments every year. In the Holocaust, by which the world never ceases to be shocked, 6 million Jews were killed: we are never allowed to forget the sheer scale of that brutality and violence. Almost double that scale – 10 million people – are dying every year, in India, but we remain unmoved, even carefully ignorant. Just because these 10 million people are not dying from bullets and bombs, or in Nazi gas chambers and torture labs, every year, does not mean there is no brutality and violence in their deaths. If anything, it is the even worse – because continuous and silently acquiesced to – brutality and violence of neglect and deprivation. We are blind to this because it is part of the structural violence of our everyday lives. Everyday, hunger and her progeny feast on freedom and defecate enslavement over the land – wave after wave of humanity are consumed by want and excreted into putrid piles of abject surrender, to malnutrition, disease and death. And we want a swachh Bharat…!!
The website Bhook.com, notes that, ‘Despite substantial improvement in health since independence and a growth rate of 8 percent in recent years, under-nutrition remains a silent emergency in India, with almost 50 percent of Indian children underweight and more than 70 percent of the women and children with serious nutritional deficiencies as anemia.’ The World Food Programme notes that the 2013 National Food Security Act (NFSA) targets above 800 million people – 75 percent of the rural and 50 percent of the urban population – living below and just above the national poverty line. Here are some more facts, from another website, Indiafoodbanking.org: 58% of children are stunted by 2 years of age; 1 in 4 children are malnourished; 3,000 children in India die every day from poor-diet related illness; and 24% of under-five deaths in India are hunger-related.
Endemic hunger and her multitudes also have human form. They stare glintingly out of the eyes of land-owners who want more land; traders who want to trade their nothing for your everything; corporate big-wigs who want to ram their drills into the bowels of your earth, extract its innards for their factories and mills, and spit ‘compensation’ at you for daring to be there in the first place; factory managers who want to cut more pay, and whip out more work from the workers; pimps and traffickers who steal and kidnap women and children, as grist for the insatiable sex-mills of the cities and the international market. Hunger hisses with a forked tongue out of the mouths of bureaucrats and politicians, as they strike deals ‘for the people’, with the landlords and traders and corporate giants; and then sucks out their sight so they cannot ever see the exploitation rampant on factory floors and brothel beds. The children of hunger have enslaved the land, but hunger has imprisoned its mind. Hunger is not an accident of fate (although it is made to appear that way); it is an instrument of history. Hunger is one of the most powerful means that the powerful have to maintain subservience.
So what does it mean to go on hunger strike in a country like India, where nearly one-fourth of the population is in a perpetually unmitigated state of hunger? Does it mean that the striker is willingly joining the masses of the hungry, as a sign of solidarity with them? Or that she is – like the sacrificing mother – giving up her food, so that somebody else gets it? Or is she striking against hunger itself, paradoxically, by invoking it within herself? Is she saying, “I am already hungry, and you are depriving me of my means of satiation; therefore I will deprive myself of the want itself. I will refuse your measly morsels of empty promises of fullness. I will starve hunger itself!”?
In a country like India, where hunger reigns like a grotesque queen with a cavernous mouth, to go on hunger-strike may mean each and all of the above; but it is most meaningful, not when the striker has plenty, and deprives himself of his plenty as his means of protest, but when the striker has little, and deprives herself of even that little, in protest. The hunger-striker seeks to wrest control of the instrument of the powerful to make her own history – to highlight the hypocrisies that hide the multifarious and deliberate deprivations that are made to masquerade as – ‘Hunger’. The hunger-striker seeks to stage that hypocrisy as a public spectacle (which is why the state tries to prevent them, or to black them out from public and media attention). The hunger-striker in India is thus the embodiment of irony as a political weapon.
Which is why it is even more profoundly ironical that prisoners should have to go on hunger-strike. Already deprived of the priceless asset of freedom, fed the measliest of morsels, and ‘staged’ in hiding, in the prison for perpetual observation, the prisoner is the embodiment of the state’s justification of its practices of deprivation. Here the state does not need to mask its deprivations as a ‘natural’, contingent condition of ‘hunger'; here the state justifies its deprivations and depradations as – ‘Correction’. (Thus it is that ‘Hunger’ and ‘Correction’ are made siblings, even in religious discourses of penitence. And thus it is that the prison inside is merely a reflection of the larger system of subjection, subjugation, incarceration and correction that constitutes the prison-house of history, on the outside.) The prisoner on hunger-strike is then, not only like the striker who says “I will starve hunger itself!”: the prisoner on hunger-strike is saying that most dangerous of things, “I will take your ‘Correction’, and stage it on my body even more than you can; I will take it and own it, and display it as I want to, under the sign of my rejection of your system, and not as you have forced me to. I will deprive myself even more than you can, so that the world can see that your deprivations mean nothing to me, and that you cannot ‘Correct’ me through your deprivations because I have done no ‘Wrong’ to be corrected.”
Dr. G N Saibaba is one such prisoner, incarcerated in Nagpur Central Jail. Victim in his childhood of the malnutrition and other deprivations that cause polio, he has fought those deprivations with a different hunger of his own – a hunger for knowledge, freedom, equality, justice, and freedom from deprivation. The 9th of May 2015 marked one year from the date that Saibaba was abducted from Delhi and removed to Nagpur, by security forces. He is charged with aiding and abetting unlawful activities, because in today’s India, to protest against the depradations of the state, and to demand freedom from hunger and want, and to refuse to accept Hunger and its enslavement of the mind – these are now unlawful activities, performed by banned organizations.
Till the end of April, Saibaba was on hunger-strike in jail, because the jail authorities had deprived him even of the medication he needs to cope, not only with his 90% disability caused by childhood polio, but with a series of debilitating ailments – of the heart, lungs, muscles, spine and now of the stomach as well. This happened despite specific orders from the court that Saibaba should be given full medical aid, as required by his medical condition. The fact is, that the court should have taken due legal cognizance of his infirmity and released Saibaba on bail immediately, under Section 437 of the CrPC, and not just ordered appropriate medical treatment. It is almost as if the state wants to say, “Here, if you want to protest so much against deprivation and subjugation, then here – taste these in all their force, in prison – and we will make a pretense of giving you enough medication to survive this treatment!”
Saibaba called off his hunger-strike and has, from all accounts, because of judicial intervention, been receiving some minimal medical treatment since then, to help him cope with his condition. However, he may not survive the prison, even before his trial begins – and that is perhaps what the Indian state also wants. Saibaba, among many others, embodies the struggle against deprivation, want, and that mystification of history called Hunger. In his passionate pursuit of knowledge, and in his commitment to his vocation as a teacher, he embodies the struggle especially against the enslavement of the mind through the technologies of want, that are being honed to sophistication by the Indian state, and by the social elites who occupy it.
Saibaba was arrested long ago by the state, when he fell victim to the polio that wandered freely through the land and confined him to a wheelchair. But when he showed that this would not stop him, he needed to be arrested again, on charges of being unlawful because he would not be stopped by his condition. It is time to demand his release with a hunger that matches that of the conjoined insatiable stomachs of the ‘Company’ and the Indian state.
Notes
[1] Hunger continues to take its largest toll in Southern Asia, which includes the countries of India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The estimate of 276 million chronically undernourished people in 2012–14 is only marginally lower than the number in 1990–92.
- See more at: http://sanhati.com/excerpted/13536/#sthash.oGp3XaBX.dpufMay 22, 2015saibaba
By Karen Gabriel and P K Vijayan
Let’s talk about hunger. Hunger is a mother. But this is not just the mother who is among the 60 per cent women who constitute the hungry people on earth; this is not the mother who starves herself so her starving child can feed; nor the mother whose one meal is constituted of leftovers at the end of the day, to keep her alive to be a mother, and survive on leftovers again the next day; nor she who will forsake even those measly morsels that keep her alive as a mother.
No, hunger is the mother whose offspring are malnutrition, disease and death. Hunger is the mother whose hydra-headed offspring endlessly mutate, various forms of malnutrition and disease and death going forth and multiplying in the land, as hunger spreads her roomy wings. Hunger and her offspring feed endlessly, gluttonously, not just on health and strength and the ability to work, but on the human spirit itself, and its dignity and self-respect. Hunger and her multitudes mock the labour of the peasant, the farmer and the worker, the artisan, the homeless and the urban poor, the artist, the small shopkeeper and the sex-worker, saying “No matter how much you want to work, no matter how much you actually work, no matter what you do or sell, you will never satiate us!”

success for maoist campaign against Salwa Judum 2

Anti-Maoist event postponed due to Naxal threat
Salwa Judum offshoot Vikas Sangharsh Samiti will have to wait to unveil its first mega event so as not to put villagers at risk. The first mega event of Vikas Sangharsh Samiti, an anti-Maoist group formed by the leaders of erstwhile anti-Maoist militia Salwa Judum, has been postponed due to the “Naxal threat” and “indifference” from the Congress party. “We have received inputs that the Maoists are threatening people against participating in our anti-Maoist movement. We can’t afford to put the villagers at risk so we have decided to postpone the first mega event that was slated to take place in Faraspal village of Dantewada on the second death anniversary of my father,” Salwa Judum founder Mahendra Karma’s son and VSS convener Chhavindra Karma told The Hindu. However, preparations are being made for a big event at Faraspal on May 25 and all the Judum leaders from different parts of Bastar will be present during the event, said a Judum leader. “People will gather in Faraspal on May 25 in remembrance of my father on his death anniversary. He was a popular leader in Bastar with a large mass following. But the event has got nothing to do with our Samiti,” said Mr.Karma.

Sources in Chhattisgarh Congress said Chhavindra Karma was called to Raipur two days ago by senior State Congress leaders, who expressed their “apprehensions” over his initiative. State Congress president Bhupesh Baghel, senior leader T.S.Singh Deo and Ajit Jogi have already announced that the Congress party would not support Mr. Karma’s initiative. The announcement of the formation of VSS, which is being perceived as the second edition of Salwa Judum earlier this month, met with criticism from rights groups, political parties and activists. The Maoists also threatened “violent backlash” and appealed to the people of Bastar to oppose Chhavindra Karma’s initiative.

Maoists call Bihar-Jharkhand bandh from Monday

salwa_judum_2416349f

RANCHI: CPI (Maoist) has given a call for two-day Bihar-Jharkhand bandh beginning on Monday to protest against the killing of Bihar Jharkhand North Chhatisgarh Special Area Committee member Sarita Ganjhu in an encounter with security forces on Jharkhand-Bihar border on May 17. The bandh will start from Sunday midnight and continue for 48 hours. A Maoist spokesperson Paramjitji, belonging to a CPI Maoist sub zonal committee, has issued posters in areas along the inter-state border announcing the bandh.
“Military action would be taken against those trying to defy the bandh. All shops should remain closed during the bandh,” a poster quoted Paramjitji. Ambulance and essential services have been kept out of the preview of the bandh. The Maoists have urged police to stop harassing innocent villagers in the name of Maoists and stop ongoing combing operations (against the extremists). CRPF IG Jharkhand sector Rakesh Kumar Mishra said the loss of Sarita Ganjhu was massive for the Maoists because she has worked as guide for several extremists. He said all units of the CRPF deployed along Bihar border and other parts of the state have been put on high alert.

“We will dominate the core areas of the Maoists and detect IEDs (improvised explosive devices) to ensure road safety,” Mishra said. A police officer said Sarita’s death has foiled Maoists plans to re-dominate CPI (Maoist) west sub zone covering Hazaribag, Chatra, Ramgarh and Koderma in Jharkhand. In the past few years Maoists have become weak in the zone. The vacuum led to the rise of Maoist rivals groups like Jharkhand Prastuti Committee and Tritiya Prastuti Committee (in the west sub zone). A group of three Maoist leaders with a 100-member central committee company was sent recently to to re-dominate the zone when Sarita was killed. ADG (operations) and state police spokesperson S N Pradhan said all districts have been put on high alert ahead of the bandh. “The district police are conducting preemptive operations to avoid any untoward incident during the bandh,” Pradhan said.